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Category Archive for 'Short Story'

Try-Again

Finished edits on “Try-Again” in the Story 1 folder; I don’t want to clutter up the blog, so I’m just going to link the .doc here (click “here,” the hyperlink should open in a new tab).

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For some, running away from reality is better than facing the facts. By refusing to acknowledge what is brought before them and shift it to their own reality, only then can they handle what is happening. This is portrayed throughout the short story, In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson Is Buried, via the narrator. The […]

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In Amy Hempel’s short story “In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried,” the masks worn by the narrator and her terminally ill friend symbolize the pair’s habits of hiding their true feelings.  The masks that these two characters wear are used to keep the sick friend from inhaling germs in her weakened state, but […]

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The first time reading this story, I was focused on figuring out what was going on. What was wrong with the narrator’s friend? Why did they have to wear masks? Was the narrator sick as well? Why does the narrator’s friend want to know so many useless facts? After taking time to think and then […]

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Under the Bed

In Ron Rash’s “Chemistry,” the reservoir, on its surface, was just a lake. Beneath, though, it was a place of surreal horrors, as Joel discovered. I found myself wondering: Why would his father keep diving, knowing all of the grim and terrible things to be found at the reservoir bottom? Was it curiosity? When I […]

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I found the most interesting aspect of Ron Rash’s short story “Burning Bright” to be the moral dilemma that Marcie, the main character, faces.  She and her husband, Carl, live in a small town in North Carolina.  The town is experiencing a major drought, and someone in a black pickup truck is setting fires in […]

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“Burning Bright” by Ron Rash

The writing in “Burning Bright” was very descriptive, allowing me to really picture the setting of the story and get an idea of the characters’ personalities. “…the corn shucks gray and papery as a hornet’s nest. She stepped off the porch and dragged a length of hose into the garden, its rubber the sole bright […]

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Robison, “I Am Twenty-One”

I think what Mary Robison is trying to portray in her short story “I Am Twenty-One” is that life is a complicated concept that one doesn’t always have the capability to steer in the direction they want it to go. Throughout the story there are key situations that can support this idea. In the beginning […]

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I found point of view to be one of the most intriguing aspects of the short story “Yours” by Mary Robison. The author creates an air of uncertainty through her use of third-person omniscient point of view, a feeling that is only added to by her utilization of past tense. Third-person omniscient point of view […]

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“Yours” by Mary Robison

The thing that stuck out to me the most about “Yours” was the fact that the characters’ roles were reversed in a way. Usually in relationships like Allison and Clark’s the older person is the one who passes away first. This was even mentioned in the story when Allison found a letter from one of […]

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Cold, Wet, and Unsafe at Any Speed

“Snow,” he said, “is overrated.” This line, lifted directly from “The Liar,” resonated with me. It is never explicitly described why James’ father believes this is so, though he seems to disapprove of the frivolity of skiing. He associates it with the people he reads about in the society section of his newspaper, which sounds […]

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Of the two short stories I read this week, “The First Day,” by Edward P. Jones, was my favorite.  This story is told from the point of view of a woman remembering her first day of kindergarten, and details the challenges that the narrator’s mother faces while trying to enroll her daughter.  Though the story […]

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Jones, “The First Day”

Imagery and the attention to detail are important parts in telling a story. For a writer to captivate readers and make them feel a part of what they are reading, transporting them into the writer’s world, that is a very powerful thing. One such write, Edward P. Jones, accomplishes this in his short story “The First […]

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Both “The Liar” and “The First Day” are stories where the main characters’ relationships with their mothers are an important part of the story.  In “The Liar,” the mother and her son have a troubled relationship, while the little girl in “The First Day” sees her mother as an infallible guardian.  Both of the children […]

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“The Liar” by Tobias Wolff

Of the two short stories I read this week, “The Liar” by Tobias Wolff was my favorite. Maybe it was the subject matter, but I spent more time pondering this story after I finished reading it than I did with the other. From the very first line, I was intrigued. There were so many questions […]

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